Newsletter | Issue 18

Subject: Out of office, DND.

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WHAT’S RIGHT, MALAYSIA?

YOU DECIDE


Apa khabar? While we chose to prioritise rest this week, and not post any newsletters, we realised there is one issue that we had to address.
This week’s tea will be focused on just one issue – the rise of IP addresses linked to child pornography – a bigger issue than the breaking news we had this week.
Niresh Kaur, Shambavi Shankar


What’s the tea in Malaysia?

sipping tea
Source: malakattribunenews
Rise in child pornography in Malaysia 
The issue – There has been a rise in IP addresses linked to child pornography in Malaysia over the past six years. 

Speaking at a launch of a campaign against online sexual crimes, our Women, Family and Community Development Minister (KPWKM), Rina Harun, stated that the Ministry views this as an unhealthy development, “especially as it involves a vulnerable group since exposure to child pornography leads to sex addiction”. 

Having a team of advisors and still making rookie mistakes equating child porn and child watching porn is unacceptable especially when you’re expected to protect these children. 
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Source: Tenor
This issue was previously highlighted in May 2022 when the PDRM Sexual, Women and Children Crime Investigation Division (D11) stated that despite identifying 93,368 IP addresses (at that point in time) related to child pornography, due to a lack of manpower, they only managed to check 103 IP addresses and arrested 50 individuals (that’s close to 50%!). Some of these arrested paedophiles also admitted to grooming and molesting these children, as well as sharing the content on the dark web. 

The D11 also hoped that the Budget 2022 allocation involving an increase in staff and financial allocation will be channelled immediately to expedite the task of catching these criminals. 

Let’s do some math. Between 2017 and March this year, there were 93,368 IP addresses suspected of being linked to sharing child pornography. According to Rina Harun, between 2017 and August this year, 106,764 IP addresses were recorded – an increase of 13,396. 
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Image Source:Tenor
The KPWKM could work with D11 in combatting this issue instead of organising campaigns (which by the way cost money) to raise awareness among parents in children regarding the usage of social media amongst children. While this is important, this is an entirely separate issue. We have an increase of 13,396 IP addresses linked to child pornography in just five months and if we don’t act now, this number is only going to double. 

This is a legal newsletter, so obviously we’ll bring up the law.  There are a few provisions in the Sexual Offences Against Children Act 2017 that specifically covers child pornography. 

Section 4 defines child pornography to include a child, as well as a person who appears to look like a child, to be engaged in sexual activities.

Section 5 –  Being involved in the making of child pornography, upon conviction, will be punished with imprisonment for a term not exceeding 30  years and whipping of not less than 6 strokes.

Section 6 – Preparing to be involved in child pornography, upon conviction, will be punished with imprisonment for a term not exceeding 10 years, and shall also be liable to whipping.

Section 7 – Offering a child to be involved in child pornography,  upon conviction, will be punished with imprisonment for a term not exceeding 20 years, and whipping of not less than 5 strokes. 

Section 8 – Distributing or exchanging child pornography, upon conviction, will be punished with imprisonment for a term not exceeding 15 years, and whipping of not less than 3 strokes. 

Section 9 – Sharing child pornography to a child, upon conviction, will be punished with imprisonment for a term not exceeding 15 years, and whipping of not less than 5 strokes. 

Section 10 – Accessing child pornography, upon conviction, will be punished with imprisonment for a term not exceeding 5 years, or a fine exceeding RM10,000.00 or both. 

Just some of the things the KPWKM could have highlighted in their campaign, instead of advising parents to monitor their children’s social media. 

Do better, KPWKM. Our children’s future is at stake here. 
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Image Source: Tenor

Coming Up Next Week

  1. General Info About Our General Election (will think of a creative title by next week). – Since elections are (surely) around the corner, we will be removing our Question of the Week section and will be replacing it with this. For limited time only. 
  2. Bonus section – Prisoner of the Week
  3. Answer to last week’s Question of the Week

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